Help & How to Use FAQs

Ice Cream

  • Extra churning will not improve the quality of the ice cream.

  • Old-Fashioned Method to Harden the Ice Cream...

    1. Leave ice cream in the canister.

    2. Place a sheet of waxed paper across the top of the can; place the canister cover over the waxed paper.

    3. Drain water and repack freezer with 5 parts of ice and 1 part of salt. Do this until entire canister and lid are covered with the ice and salt mixture.

    4. Cover with a burlap bag or some suitable materials for insulation. Let stand until frozen hard. Oftentimes 30 minutes are enough, but you can easily check by removing the canister lid and testing the hardness of the ice cream with a spoon.

  • It is best to make a cooked recipe the night before, so it has plenty of time to chill.

  • Fill your wooden tub with ice to the top of the canister. Crank or run your motor for about 2 minutes so that the canister chills evenly. Add 2 cups of rock salt to the top of the ice. As the ice melts down to 2 to 3 inches, add more ice and 2 more cups of rock salt.

  • Do not fill the canister more than half full of mixture to be frozen. The mixture expands as it freezes.

  • All you need is your favorite ice cream recipe or one of ours, rock salt, ice and your White Mountain┬« Ice Cream Maker!

  • The ice cream maker can be used inside or out. Please protect all working surfaces with newspaper, towels or other covering. Salt is corrosive. You will also need to drain the bucket of the salt brine mixture when finished, so outside or near a sink or drain would be best. Be careful not to kill backyard grass with the sale brine mixture when making ice cream outdoors.

Ice Cream Maker

  • This ice cream maker is supplied with an AUTO SAFETY SHUTOFF. Should the electric motor (electric models only) become overheated it will turn off. In order to restart the ice cream freezer, the following steps must be followed:
    1. Unplug the ice cream freezer.

    2. Wait at least 20 minutes for motor to cool.

    3. Plug in and operate normally.

  • 1. Place the stainless steel canister into the wooden tub, so that it rests easily on the metal guide in the bottom of the tub. Insert your dasher in the canister making sure that the protrusion on the bottom of the canister fits into the socket of the dasher.

    2. After pouring your refrigerated recipe into the canister, assemble the can cover and turn the dasher stem with your fingers until it turns freely.

    3. Place the gear frame into position by grasping the gear frame and engaging the dasher stem into the socket of the gear frame.

    4. For Hand Crank Models: Slide the cranking end into the tub ear. The opposite end of the gear frame will fit into the tub latch. Gently push the thumb latch down until the gear frame is snug.

    5. For Electric Models: Be sure to hold the unit with the label facing you. Insert the right side of the unit into the steel ear and the left side (marked latch end) fits into the latch. Gently push the thumb latch down until the unit is secure.

  • Align the silver White Mountain logo on the outside top of the green motor to be facing the same direction as the White Mountain bucket badge. Both should face you when you put the unit together. Drop the motor down onto the spindle and slide the motor "ears" into the bracket slots - very simple.

  • When not being used continuously, the wooden tub of your freezer will become dried out after it has been stored away for any length of time. You should put 3 to 4 inches of water into the tub before each use (especially when using for the first time). This will give the wood a chance to swell up so that the salt brine solution will not leak out during the freezing process. Remember to store in a cool location to help increase the life of your freezer.

  • Align the silver White Mountain logo on the outside top of the green motor to be facing the same direction as the White Mountain bucket badge. Both should face you when you put the unit together. Drop the motor down onto the spindle and slide the motor "ears" into the bracket slots. This new and improved design does not need a latch to hold the motor in place.

  • Align the White Mountain logo on the top of the hand crank to be facing the same direction as the White Mountain bucket badge. Both should face you when you put the unit together - with the handle on your right side. Drop the motor down onto the spindle and slide the hand crank "ears" into the bracket slots. This new and improved design does not need a latch to hold the hand crank in place.

Rock Salt

  • The salt used in making homemade ice cream is rock salt. It is a coarse salt and should be used instead of regular table salt.

  • The amount of the ice and rock salt you use varies according to the ambient air temperature. Do not increase salt usage until you have churned the freezer for at least 10 minutes. After 10 minutes, you should notice the cream becoming firmer. If too much salt is used, the result will be excessive freezing to the extent that a crust of frozen cream will form on the inside edge of the can while the middle will remain liquid. If this occurs, allow the brine to warm up by taking a scoop of salt and ice out of the bucket and then decrease the amount of salt added when you next add more ice.

  • We need a salt concentration, or a ratio of 5 cups of ice to 1 cup of salt. This will keep our brine temperature constant at 8 to 12 degrees Fahrenheit. This will give us the rapid cooling and freezing that is essential to making smooth, creamy ice cream.

    Freezing time should not be too slow or too fast. A greater amount of salt will melt the ice faster causing the ice cream to freeze faster. Freezing too quickly will not allow for sufficient agitation and will produce a coarse texture. An extended period of freezing causes a spongy, buttery texture.

  • Use a glass or plastic measuring cup for rock salt, as salt may pit a metal container.

  • The freezing takes place in the White Mountain┬« ice cream maker by using rock salt and ice as a refrigerant. Rock salt causes ice to melt quicker by lowering its melting point. The "brine solution" or liquid that forms in the wooden bucket absorbs heat from the ice cream mix and gradually lowers the temperature of the mix until it begins to freeze.

    If no salt was added to the ice, it would melt at 32 degrees Fahrenheit and eventually the ice water and ice cream mix would stay at 32 degrees. Since Ice cream will not begin to freeze until its temperature falls below 27 degrees, we need to add salt and lower the melting point of the ice.